BLESSINGS FROM A TRUE AMERICAN HERO

This post is not about The Call Kansas City. It deals with something much bigger.

Earlier this month, the Delaware Crossing Chapter of the Sons of the American Revolution gave The Call KC one of our biggest recognitions to date. We were honored with the Bronze Good Citizenship Medal to recognize our organization’s “notable services in behalf of our American principles.

To say the least, it was quite the distinction and we are tremendously grateful. But truthfully, we are far more appreciative for what came afterwards.

Following our introduction, we were placed right next to a local WWII veteran, who was getting honored for his past bravery and courage. One of the greatest acts possible is defending the freedom of someone else and we were lucky enough to meet someone who did that plus more.

Unfortunately, the event’s program was misplaced and this particular writer’s memory is failing so the veteran’s name will go unknown. However, we will never forget his voice, his words and his spirit.

For the rest of the morning, the 80-plus year old man was recognized for his services to the American war effort during the second World War, specifically his time at Bastogne. The ceremony included several awards, including one from a regional French consulate, a wonderful gentleman in his own right who was a teenage resident at Bastogne during the war.

By the end of the local war hero’s acceptance speech, the packed hotel conference room was standing and clapping unabashedly. His sentiment was simple — don’t waste ones’ blessings.

“Think of what you have and what you are doing with those blessings. Yet, more importantly, think of what you are doing to share them.”

Think of those words as you go about your life today. Think of what you have and what you are doing with those blessings. Yet, more importantly, think of what you are doing to share them.

We can not waste what others have given to us. Instead, we must use them to better our communities, our cities and our world. Like this local war hero, the generations before ours learned that.

Let us not forget it.